Archives : Deschutes River Conservancy

Three 2016 River Successes You Need to Know About

December 22nd, 2016

We are here because we love the Deschutes River. Our local rivers give life to an otherwise arid, high desert climate. No matter who we are, we are all connected to the river, and therefore, to each other.
 
By working together with farmers, fisherman and urban communities, we have done great things.
 
Central Oregon’s rivers have seen some hopeful successes in 2016. We’d like to thank our partners, supporters and funders who have helped:

  • Restore water back to the Middle Deschutes. Through your support of our Leasing Program, 2135 acres and 10,180 acre-feet of water were protected instream from April through October, with protected peak flows of up to 31.15 cfs from mid-May to mid-September.
  • Increase Minimum Winter Flows in the Upper Deschutes. The Oregon Spotted Frog Settlement Agreement has ensured a permanent increase in winter flows raising the minimum from 20 cfs to 100 cfs. This is a first step toward further flow restoration we hope to accomplish through continued partnership and collaboration within the basin.
  • Improve Conditions for Salmon and Steelhead in Whychus Creek. Increased flows through piping and partner-led habitat restoration work have improved summer flows for Salmon and Steelhead in Whychus Creek.

We want to sincerely thank all of you who have supported the Deschutes River this year. We need the river—and now, the river needs us. We pledge to work together to care for the river today and for generations to come!
 
Join us in continuing to restore the Deschutes River and its tributaries in 2017. By working together, we really can do great things!

 

“Together we can do great things,” says DRC Exec. Dir. Tod Heisler

December 15th, 2016

From the Desk of the Executive Director, Tod Heisler

This year has been unpredictable for many reasons. Water supply, climate change and politics have all been top of mind.

As we enter uncertain times, it is important for us to work together as a community. To keep calling for the protection of our beautiful places. To keep educating our children about the value of nature.

In my family, we have all pledged to do everything we can to protect the beautiful world we live in.

In the Deschutes Basin, we have been working to set aside our differences and find solutions for water conservation where we can all win – fish, families and farmers.

Though we’ve been successfully working at this for twenty years, today we need your help more than ever.

Restoration of the Upper Deschutes is our greatest undertaking and affects our entire region. We can’t do this without community support.

We need you to pledge your support to restoring the Deschutes River. We need you to pledge to do everything you can to conserve water and educate others.

Please join us in being a river supporter. The only way we will see healthy flows in the Upper Deschutes is by pulling together.

Together we can do great things!

 

Some like it hot – but not fish

September 6th, 2015

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July was hot; the hottest month on record according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Combine that with an unusually warm winter, dismally low snowpack and drought declaration in 90% of Oregon and you get some pretty unhappy conditions for fish and other river dwellers.

Native fish such as trout and salmon thrive in river temperatures below 60°F, but as water warms and oxygen levels decrease, fish become stressed. An increase to 68°F and above can turn a river lethal for most native fish.

Sadly, thousands of fish died around Oregon this summer as a result of the low flows, warm water and increased levels of temperature related diseases. We hope the weather conditions we experienced this summer will give way to more normal patterns, but we do have to acknowledge the likelihood of more droughts in the future.

The good news is that here in the Deschutes Basin, many of our streams are spring fed and don’t tend to get as warm as other streams in Oregon. While flows in the Deschutes River below Bend can approach unhealthy temperatures, colder snow-melt tributaries such as Tumalo and Whychus Creeks help cool flows and preserve a healthier habitat.

With our partners, we are now underway with the Upper Deschutes Basin Study which will design the next generation of water management projects to restore flows in the Deschutes River help modernize century old water management practices that are no longer sustainable for today’s diverse needs.

We all have an interest in maintaining healthy rivers. We are all working together to create a sustainable water plan in the Deschutes Basin for tomorrow and for generations to come. Support this important process by getting informed and sharing information with others.

Read more at www.deschutesriver.org.

New opportunities for longtime DRC Program Director, Scott McCaulou

May 13th, 2013

The DScott_Web4d300feschutes River Conservancy wishes longtime staff member, Scott McCaulou, the best of luck in his new position as the Program Director of the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program at the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation in Portland.

Over the past fourteen years at the DRC, Scott presided over a period of tremendous growth and oversaw streamflow restoration projects that resulted in more than 200 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water being restored to Central Oregon’s rivers and streams.

“A large part of the DRC’s success over the past decade can be attributed to Scott’s steady hand and mastery of project design and implementation,” said DRC Executive Director, Tod Heisler. “We will miss him greatly at the DRC, but his new position will allow him to take the expertise he has gathered so far to support organizations engaged in restoring streamflow throughout the greater Columbia Basin.

Support the DRC in a very simple way!

May 21st, 2012

Buy a button for only $10 and give back to the river you love.

Healthy rivers and streams are a vital part of our quality of life here in Central Oregon as well as a legacy we leave behind for our children and grandchildren. The DRC has many ways to give back to the rivers and streams you love, and this year’s button campaign is an accessible way for everyone to do their part to ensure the beauty of the Deschutes Basin endures for generations to come. Buy your button today at the Deschutes Brewery Pubs in Bend and Portland, Deschutes Brewery’s Tasting Room, Visit Bend, Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe, The DRC Office, and most Bend Broadband summer event booths.

As a thank you for your support, your button gives you all kinds of discounts from great local businesses.