Archives : Conservation Projects on Whychus Creek

Weed Pulling in Sisters to Care for Formerly Irrigated Lands

July 20th, 2017


DRC worked with several landowners to transfer 0.87 cfs of senior water rights off of developing lands at the edge of Sisters (2012 – 2016). The Whychus Creek irrigation diversion was a fish barrier and difficult to manage, the small ditch did not transport the water effectively and the landowner with the largest water right was no longer interested in farming.

When the water was submitted for transfer, the 30+ acre property was seeded with native and dryland grasses to deter weeds. A few years later the diversion structure was removed and the riparian area restored by UDWC.

DRC staff take a morning each year to walk the previously irrigated property and pull noxious weeds. Each year of weed-pulling nets fewer and fewer noxious weeds, though it’s very beneficial to continue pulling as seeds continue to blow in from neighboring properties.

A huge thank you to DRC’s Gen Hubert (left) for organizing this event each year!

Deschutes Partnership Awarded $4M Through Focused Investment Program

January 23rd, 2017

Whychus Creek meandering through Camp Polk Meadow near Sisters, Oregon.

This week, the Deschutes River Conservancy helped welcome the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) to the Deschutes Basin and attended OWEB’s quarterly board meeting in Madras. The Deschutes Partnership and partner organizations (DRC, the Deschutes Land Trust, Upper Deschutes watershed Council and the Crooked River Watershed Council) reported to OWEB board members on its experience with OWEB’s Focused Investment Partnership (FIP) program. OWEB awarded the Deschutes Partnership $4M through the FIP program over the 2015-2017 biennium to help restore  the physical and biological conditions necessary for successful anadromous fish reintroduction in the Deschutes Basin. DRC used funding from this grant to support its work on Whychus Creek with Three Sisters Irrigation District and to increase streamflow on McKay Creek, a tributary to the Crooked River. DRC is grateful to OWEB for its support of our work over the years. OWEB’s significant investment in the Deschutes Partnership has helped to leverage resources and increase the pace and scale of restoration in the Deschtues Basin.

The Deschutes Partnership presenting to OWEB. This is what conservation sometimes looks like behind the scenes.

Celebrating Marc Thalacker of Three Sisters Irrigation District

January 18th, 2017

This week we are celebrating our longstanding partnership with Marc Thalacker and his 20th anniversary as Manager of the Three Sisters Irrigation District.  Marc’s vision, will and determination were instrumental in the achievement of historic change for Whychus Creek and the district.  In 1999, when Mid-Columbia Steelhead became ESA listed species, Marc assessed the threat and embraced an aggressive plan to restore Whychus Creek and protect his district.  Marc worked closely with his board, patrons and stakeholders to pipe the district’s canal conserving and restoring 14.32 cfs (soon 1.16 more) to Whychus Creek while providing pressurized water to his patrons.  The DRC has invested more than $10 million in the district’s canal piping over the past 6 years and the district will be fully piped by next year.  As a result, Whychus Creek is one of the few places in Oregon where the state’s minimum streamflows have been achieved.  Thank you Marc for our great partnership and wonderful success story.