Help Us Raise the Deschutes

Our Rivers Need Help
Be Part of the Solution


Check River Flows Gages & Reservoir Levels Flows Reservoirs

NEW! Learn more about the Deschutes River Basin at our Raise the Deschutes Seminar Series starting in July

 

Get to know the
Deschutes River Basin

The Deschutes River Basin is the second-largest watershed in Oregon, covering more than 10,000 square miles.

learn more (2).jpg

Get to know the deschutes river basin.jpg

 

Upper Deschutes_RTD.jpg

​​why do our rivers need help?

Water in the Deschutes Basin has been over-allocated since the early 1900s, causing many stream reaches to suffer from unnaturally high and low flows at different times of the year. These altered flows have resulted in poor water quality, degraded habitat for fish and wildlife, fish mortality, and streambank erosion.

learn more (2).jpg

 

​​where does our water come from?

Snowpack melt-off is the largest contributor to streamflow; it soaks into the ground to recharge the groundwater aquifer.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Snowy Mountain.jpg

 

Get to know the
Deschutes River Basin

The Deschutes River Basin is the second-largest watershed in Oregon, covering more than 10,000 square miles.

learn more (2).jpg

Get to know the deschutes river basin.jpg

 

​​why do our rivers need help?

Water in the Deschutes Basin has been over-allocated since the early 1900s, causing many stream reaches to suffer from unnaturally high and low flows at different times of the year. These altered flows have resulted in poor water quality, degraded habitat for fish and wildlife, fish mortality, and streambank erosion.

learn more (2).jpg

Upper Deschutes_RTD.jpg

 

​​where does our water come from?

Snowpack melt-off is the largest contributor to streamflow; it soaks into the ground to recharge the groundwater aquifer.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Snowy Mountain.jpg
RTD Home Page Crops in Field.jpg

​​WHERE DOES THE WATER GO?

Nearly 90% of the streamflow from the Deschutes River and its tributaries is typically diverted through irrigation canals during the irrigation season (April - October).

learn more (2).jpg

 

​​UNDERSTANDING WATER RIGHTS

Under Oregon law, all water is publicly owned and a water right is needed to use water from any source. Irrigators with the oldest water rights are the last to be shut off in times of low streamflows. This creates inequity between senior (older rights) and junior (younger rights), especially in dry years.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Sprinklers in Field.jpg
RTD Home Page Deschutes River with Lava.jpg

 

HOW CENTRAL OREGON'S VOLCANIC GEOLOGY PLAYS A ROLE

In the Deschutes River Basin, volcanic geology controls everything from channel shape to water temperature to summer flow levels.

learn more (2).jpg

 

​​WHAT CAN WE DO?

Partners are working in the basin to secure sufficient water supply to meet current and future water needs for rivers, agriculture, and cities. There's a lot of work to do, but if we work together, we can create a more resilient future for Central Oregon's rivers and streams.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Fish Underwater.jpg

​​WHERE DOES THE WATER GO?

Nearly 90% of the streamflow from the Deschutes River and its tributaries is typically diverted through irrigation canals during the irrigation season (April - October).

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Crops in Field.jpg

 

​​UNDERSTANDING WATER RIGHTS

Under Oregon law, all water is publicly owned and a water right is needed to use water from any source. Irrigators with the oldest water rights are the last to be shut off in times of low streamflows. This creates inequity between senior (older rights) and junior (younger rights), especially in dry years.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Sprinklers in Field.jpg

 

HOW CENTRAL OREGON'S VOLCANIC GEOLOGY PLAYS A ROLE

In the Deschutes River Basin, volcanic geology controls everything from channel shape to water temperature to summer flow levels.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Deschutes River with Lava.jpg

 

​​WHAT CAN WE DO?

Partners are working in the basin to secure sufficient water supply to meet current and future water needs for rivers, agriculture, and cities. There's a lot of work to do, but if we work together, we can create a more resilient future for Central Oregon's rivers and streams.

learn more (2).jpg

RTD Home Page Fish Underwater.jpg